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Friday, February 7, 2020 | History

5 edition of Religions, values, and peak-experiences found in the catalog.

Religions, values, and peak-experiences

Abraham H. Maslow

Religions, values, and peak-experiences

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Published by Penguin Arkana in New York, London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Abraham H. Maslow.
The Physical Object
Paginationxx, 123p. ;
Number of Pages123
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22643721M
ISBN 100140194878

They are being taken away from the Religions jurisdiction of the institutionalized churches and are becoming the "property," so to speak, of a new type of humanistic scientist who is vigorously values the old claim of the established religions to be the sole arbiters of all questions of faith and morals. It was disappointing for two reasons: first, Maslow first establishes this normative, value-laden definition of the transcendental experience the "peak experience" as something beyond the small minds of "positivists" that is, empiricists, behavioralists, etc. Drugs, which can be helpful when wisely used, become dangerous when foolishly used. Until that point is reached at which he has a conscious, objective, detached awareness of the relationship between a particular name or label or word and a particular set of subjective, ineffable experiences, no communication and no teaching are possible; so also for passivity or hostility or yearning for love or whatever. Though the answers were not acceptable, the questions themselves were and are perfectly acceptable, and perfectly legitimate. This makes an almost insoluble problem for the writer who is intent on demonstrating that the common base of all religions is human, natural, empirical, and that so-called spiritual values are also naturally derivable.

Direct verbal description and peak-experiences book peak-experiences in a sober, cool, analytic, "scientific" way succeeds only with those who already know what you mean, i. My study of the failure of most Utopian efforts has taught me to ask the basic questions themselves in a more practicable and researchable way. They learn inevitably that most people think atomistically, in terms of either-or, black-white, all in or all out, of mutual exclusiveness and separativeness. It even contradicts the traditionally religious versions of mystic experience, not to mention the experiences of satori, of Nirvana, and other Eastern versions of peak-and mystic experiences.

If organized Religions has any ultimate effects at all, it is through its power to shake the individual in his deepest insides. The peak-experience itself can often meaningfully be called a "little death," and a rebirth in various senses. Such a person may go through the same motions and behaviors as his more numerous coreligionists, but he is never reduced to the behavioral, as most of them are. In all of these, we may use the paradigm that the process of education and of therapy is helping the person to become aware of internal, subjective, subverbal experiences, so that these experiences can be brought into the world of abstraction, of conversation, of communication, of naming, etc. As a matter of fact, this expanded science includes among its concerns practically everything in religion that can bear naturalistic observation. This is often a great danger and always an unnecessary handicap.


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Religions, values, and peak-experiences book

The perceiver can more readily look upon nature as if it were there in itself and for itself, not simply as if it were a human playground put there for human purposes.

When the atmosphere becomes one and peak-experiences book brotherly communion, however, with perhaps one of the "investigator-brothers" himself also taking the drug, then the experience is much more likely to be ecstatic and transcendent. We must remember that the gods have been considered generally to have no needs or wants, no deficiencies, no lacks, and to be gratified in all things.

If the sole good in life becomes the peak-experience, and if all means to Religions end become good, and if more peak-experiences are Religions than fewer, then one can force the issue, push actively, strive and hunt and fight for them. My study of the failure of most Utopian efforts has taught me to ask the basic questions themselves in a more practicable and researchable way.

As he put on one of them to please her, she asked sadly, "And why do you hate the other tie? Or, to be more cautious, this is what seems to occur in my sample, i. I would add here that maturing and aging mean also some loss of first-timeness, of novelty, of sheer unpreparedness and surprise.

If you look up the Religions "sacred," "divine," "holy," "numen," "sin," "prayer," "oblation," "thanksgiving," "worship," "piety," "salvation," "reverence," the dictionary will most often tell you that they refer to a god or to a religion in the supernatural sense.

What this all adds up to is this: small r religion is quite compatible, at the higher levels of personal development, with rationality, with science, with social passion. It becomes amoral, even sometimes anti-moral and even anti-human, merely technology which can be bought by anyone for any purpose, like the German "scientists" who could work with equal zeal for Nazis, for Communists, or for Americans.

No, it is quite clear from our experience of the last fifty years or so that the pre certainties of the humanists, of the artists, of the dramatists and poets, of the philosophers, of the critics, and of those who are generally inner-directed have given way to a chaos of relativism.

Upon which of them can an "idealistic" young man model himself? The forms, rituals, ceremonials, and verbal formulae in which he was reared remain for him experientially rooted, symbolically meaningful, archetypal, unitive. As a matter of fact, contemporary existential and humanistic psychologists would probably consider a person sick or abnormal in an existential way if he were not concerned with these "religious" questions.

That is to say, B-cognition, because it makes human irrelevance more possible, enables us thereby to see more truly the nature of the object in itself. Very obviously, such values and such hungers cannot be handed over to any church for safekeeping.

Drugs, which can be helpful when wisely used, become dangerous when foolishly used. Only then do they have meaning and effect. Peak-experiences can make life worthwhile by their occasional occurrence. This is not as simple a happening as one might imagine from the bare words themselves.

The "rhapsodic communication," as I have called it, consists of a kind of emotional contagion in isomorphic parallel. In a word, if should help him to become the best he is capable of becoming, to become actually what he deeply is potentially.

This procedure can wind up being a kind of continuing rhapsodic, emotional, eager throwing out of one example after another of peaks, described or rather reported, expressed, shared, "celebrated," sung vividly with participation and with obvious approval and even joy.

He becomes less an object, less a thing, less a thing of the world living under the laws of the physical world, and he becomes more a psyche, more a person, more subject to the psychological laws, especially the laws of what people have called the "higher life.Oct 07,  · Religions, Values, and Peak-Experiences by Abraham H.

Maslow On the request of a local pastor who said he would be interested in my views of it, I read this book. Maslow was a well known Psychologist who is best known for his theory of the hierarchy of human needs.

In this book, he delves into the realm of values and their formations/5(34). Religions, Values, and Peak-Experiences Abraham H.

Religions, Values, and Peak

Maslow it looks quite probable that the peak-experience may be the model of the religious revelation or the religious illumination or conversion which has played so great a role in the history of religions. But, because peak-experiences are in the natural world and because we can research.

Over Regression-Values Under Good Conditions I. An Example of B-Analysis Bibliography.

Peak experience

Religions, Values, and Peak Experiences © by Kappa Delta Pi and © (preface) The Viking Press. Published by Penguin Books Limited ISBN 0 14 8 At the request of the publisher, this book is no longer available from The Psychedelic Library.

Religions, Values, and Peak-Experiences by Abraham H. Maslow. Penguin Books. Paperback. GOOD. Spine creases, wear to binding and pages from reading.

May contain limited notes, underlining or highlighting that does affect the text. Possible ex library copy, that’ll have the markings and stickers associated from the library. Accessories such as CD, codes, toys, may not be included.

Buy Religions, Values, and Peak-Experiences (Paperback) at hildebrandsguld.com The first third of the book Maslow rails against organized "big R" religion. He is overly-extreme in his criticisms (Maslow admits as much in the preface) and I almost gave up on the book because of it.

Good thing I didn't, as his studies on peak-experiences and the 2/5(2).

Religions, Values, and Peak Experiences

Religions, Values, and Peak-experiences Abraham Harold Humanistic Psychology humility ideal impulses instance integration intrinsic isomorphic John Dewey kind knowledge liberal liberal religions ligions mankind Maslow means menstruation mysterious mystic experience Religions, values, and peak-experiences Viking compass book Viking 2/5(2).